The Greek Dark Ages

1378 Words6 Pages
To begin with, The Greek "Dark Ages" was a lost time for Greece. It marked an era of cultural discovery, religion, and socio-political institutions. It wasn't until 1200 B.C.E during the Bronze Age after the Dorians, Greek speaking Hellenic people, came from the Northeastern Mountains and caused the obliteration of the Mycenaean civilization that Greece really felt the effects of what was to come. Due to the collapse of the Mycenaean’s, their palaces were demolished, their art, their way of life, and most importantly their system of writing (HistoryWiz, 2008). With a significant drop in population, they lived a pastoral lifestyle in small groups. Desperate to keep the history of early Greece alive, with the loss of their Linear B script…show more content…
This birthed their works in poetry and religion. For instances epic poems, such as The Iliad and The Odyssey, by the blind poet Homer, although many wonders if he even existed, became the national poem of early Greece. It documented the history of Greece, wonders of the Mycenaean’s, and the Trojan War. It was the first way they could spread their culture besides orally. It united people who spoke Greek, and gave them a base for their heritage. The epic gave a sense of honor and nobility. It helped define what the Greeks were all about, and is the very reason why they are still studied today. Another aspect of the Greek culture that was represented at the time was religion. Ancient Greeks thought their gods as an immortal family who played a part in the everyday lives of human beings. The tales were passed throughout the Mediterranean and traced their beginnings as a result of Zeus’s fury with human evil. Lastly, the Dark ages allowed for the use of a new socio-political institution that subsequently allowed the rise of…show more content…
For example, The Parthenon Greek for "maiden" built-in 447 BC is the most preserved and highly influential building of the Roman era. This structure really captures the Greek's idea of humanism because it is a physical embodiment of their values and beliefs. The Parthenon, unlike the Egyptians who built pyramids for the dead, celebrated life on earth rather than the afterlife. As a result, of the architecture being served as a sacred shrine dedicated to Athena the goddess of wisdom and war, treasury, and a civic meeting place, it united religious and secular domains. In addition, the Parthenon was built according to human proportions. The design of the building is so complex that it took modern architects thirty years to restore when it took the Greeks about eight to nine years to build. In fact, it is so complex that with its individual cut marbles every single piece is unique to the structure and one of the secrets of the structure is that there is not a single straight line within the Parthenon. Also, according to Landmark in Humanities, "The rectangle delimited on all four sides by a colonnaded walkway, reflects the typical classical reverence for clarity and symmetry" (Fiero, 57). Designers and architects Phidias, Ictinus, and Callicrates had a search for clarity, regularity, balance, and enormous proportions. Considering these details, it is clear that the Parthenon, with its intricate
Open Document