Captain Corelli Mandolin Character Analysis

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The human mind, even though powerful in many unexplainable ways, still has the weakness of being controlled. Some might find it easier to resist being manipulated while some might fall into it more easily; it all depends on the strength of one’s willpower and their hold on their own beliefs and values. Men who served in the war are a prime example of how people can be easily indoctrinated to believe that their enemies will forever be their enemies. In Captain Corelli’s Mandolin written by Louis de Bernières, both the Italian and German soldiers that are positioned in Greece show signs of breaking away from that belief, however the Italians show more strength in following what they think and feel is right which leads to them overcoming their…show more content…
They allow Günter Weber, a German Lieutenant, to join their La Scala group even though their first meeting is unbearably awkward. The conversation would have gone down the wrong path if it wasn’t for Corelli who breaks the difficult silence by handing Weber a bottle of red wine and saying, “ 'drink and be happy '” (de Bernières 244). Even though the both of them are on guard and wary of each other’s moves, Corelli still makes an attempt to ensure they do not end up in a brawl as there are other Italians around that would have become physically defensive if one wrong move is made. It turns out to be a smart move, fortunately, for the Captain to offer him a globally welcomed drink of alcohol to prevent the tension from building because Weber thoroughly enjoys his night without any unwanted commotion. By doing this, Antonio also shows agency as he does not want any troubles to arise so that he can have a good night with his companions and a new possible friend. Corelli also shows his feelings for the Germans even after the event of the firing squad in which most of his friends were executed whereas Pelagia claims that she will always hate the Germans for what they did. Despite nearly meeting his end, Antonio defends Günter Weber when Pelagia expresses her hate while they spend time together.…show more content…
After being in Greece and away from the battlefield, the Italian soldiers realise that it feels better to stop following what they were meant to follow which inevitably leads to them disobeying and disrespecting their leaders. General Gandin is a victim of this treatment as he does not act as a proper leader; it causes Corelli to take matters into his own hands. When the war is reaching its climax in Captain Corelli 's Mandolin and Gandin does not give proper orders to the troops, a young lad from Naples asks, “‘What about Gandin?’ in which Antonio Corelli replies, ‘If we have to, we 'll arrest him’” (de Bernières 375). This demonstrates a huge defiance towards a leader because Corelli is only a Captain, which falls under the command of a General and just by saying that, he puts his life at risk. He becomes more independent as he breaks away from the indoctrination because he is not afraid to go against someone of a higher rank when he feels as though they are not doing their job correctly. It seems as though Antonio believes that the ones in command are just leading the army blindly, not knowing exactly what to do in the time of crisis. Another Captain positioned in Greece also feels as though he should finally do something right which leads him into disrespecting the hierarchy of power and executing a plan without any orders whatsoever. De Bernières writes, “who

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