The Human Relations Theory

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Tutorial CRN: 74854 Tutor Name: Hugh Dromey SBUS10040 Foundations of Management Thought University College Dublin Title: Critique Barley and Kunda’s (1992) assertion that American managerial discourse has progressed in waves that have alternated between normative and rational rhetorics of control. Student Name: Ted Collins Student Number: 14446392 Submission Deadline: Monday 1st of Decmeber 2014 “By submitting your work via this link you declare that all materials included in this submission are the product of your own work and that due acknowledgement have been given in the submission body and in the bibliography…show more content…
Its managerial discourse is an ideology of normative control that took place from 1923 – 1955. It was the welfare capitalism after world war one that sparked the change to normative control once again. However there was a change in this normative control as instead of the old themes of improved workingmen and communalism the modern rhetorics focused on entitlements and improved working conditions. During this period, managerial theorists fashioned a rhetoric of control that focused on psychology and group behaviour. Many managerial theorists began to gain interest in the work of Freud who would have been involved in studying psychology. Elton Mayo was one managerial theorist who really got involved in clinical psychology, he was appointed to the faculty of the Harvard Business School during his career. His book ‘The Human Problems of Industry’ became a best seller. It was not until the 1940’s that human relations movement had some institutional support. After World War Two corporate experimentation expanded rapidly with strategies for amplifying loyalty, satisfaction and motivation. By the 1950’2 the human relations movement had become very well recognized. Like scientific management, human relations progressed slowly over several decades. In contrast to scientific management’s rationalism and individualism, human relations theorists believe that workers were fundamentally social…show more content…
Although she was a “distinguished political student” and philosopher she also showed a keen interest in business and management during the human relations era and therefore she did not allow her poltical connotations to affect her objective analysis. Evidence of this can be found in her papers, where it is clear that men like Taylor and Fayol influenced her. Her innovative ideas regarding control, conflict, authority, leadership and coordination have changed the way people see management, and had a great influence on the normative human relations/welfare capitalism
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