Second Language Influences

1075 Words5 Pages
New research reveals that when we learn our mother tongue, we acquire certain habits of thought that shape our experience in significant ways and often very surprising ways. Researchers theorize that different languages influence our minds in different ways – not only because of what our language allows us to think but also because of what it habitually obliges us to think about. When a language routinely obliges us to specific types of information, it forces us to be attentive to certain details in the world and to certain aspects of experience that speakers of other languages may be thinking about. As these habits of speech are cultivated from the very young age, it is only natural that that habit of speech can settle into habits of mind,…show more content…
They have (a) the co-activation ability to have both languages simultaneously active in the brain, (b) the inhibition ability to select a correct language while hearing more than one at a time, and (c) until adolescence huge new connections are being made between neurons to store patterns and information collected from the environment. Cognitively, they are also better to figure out what other people are thinking. Scientists are now only beginning to look closely at how acquiring a second language influences learning, behavior, the dilemma, encountering an object, action or concept and instantaneously toggling between two different words to describe it and the very structure of the brain that process it. Such nimble decision making ought to improve on-the-fly problem solving, and studies show that it does. Multi-lingual kids seem to exhibit a greater facility with skills that relied on interpreting symbolic representations, such as math or music. When you think and act in foreign language you are not only more attentive but also, as research shows, you take more risk over the…show more content…
The concept of humanism has been very pronounced in western philosophy since the time of the Greeks. It was Protagoras who said, “Man is the measure of all things.” This philosophy takes man as the starting point; the study of man becomes the center of all philosophical thinking. The man, the world, and the god have constituted three axis of important foci of Western thought from the beginnings of recorded history. The contemporary significance of these themes, however, has varied from one epoch to another. Western thought has laid greater stress on the existence of the individual human being than have the great speculative systems of the East – in Brahmanism, for example, personal identity dissolves in the
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