The Igbo Tribe

794 Words4 Pages
The Igbo people were a tribe living in Nigeria in the late 19th century. Their way of living is remarkably diverse than the lifestyle of people living in Western continents. While the Igbo people have very similar resources to western people, they use them in varying ways, such as farming. Farming is crucial for their clan’s survival, they use crops such as yams as a food source and for ceremonial purposes. Not only is farming a great way to get food, members of the tribe who farm a great deal, are seen as more important or powerful. All members of a family are expected to participate in farming, even the women. But women plant different crops, things that are easier to plant such as coco-yams, beans and cassava (Achebe, 23). Then, the women…show more content…
Weddings are an extremely valued ritual to the Igbo people, especially since the whole village is invited to come. Weddings are primarily thought of as a women’s ceremony, especially since the bride’s mother is expected to do all of the cooking for the invited guests (Achebe, 110). For weddings in Umuofia, the husband of the bride is expected to pay a bride price to the family of the bride in order to marry her (Achebe 65). Men will sometimes help with the slaughtering of animals for the wedding feast (Achebe 113).Throughout feasts, women do work such as cleaning and cooking while men provide entertainment and company. “The Feast of the New Yam was held every year before the harvest began, to honor the earth goddess and the ancestral spirits of the clan” (Achebe, 36). The Igbo people use the yams to give thanks to the spirits that they value. In order to prepare for the ritual, women were expected to clean the walls of the huts until they were spotless. They do all of the cooking for the event. Women also decorate their bodies with cam wood and black patterns for the Feast of New Yams. One of the most import wrestling matches that takes place is on the second day of the new…show more content…
When a man has a family, he is expected to provide his wives and children. Many Igbo men have multiple wives, he can have as many wives as he can support. The more wives a man has, the more wealth he has. The oldest wife is generally the most respected wife. For example, the first wife will often wear an anklet with her husband’s titles, only the first wife is allowed to wear the anklet (Achebe, 20). Also the other wives cannot drink before the first wife during a meal (Achebe, 20). Women of the family, meaning the wives and daughters, are expected to cook for the family. When the daughters come of age, they are married off to men who can provide the highest bridal price (Achebe, 65). This is a valued ritual among families in Umuofia. The sons of families generally inherit things from his father, such as; barns, titles, and young wives (Achebe 18). This family ritual is what helps the son start his adult life. The stories that parents tell their sons and daughters depend on the gender of the parent. Men tell stories about killing, and violence, while women tell stories that have life lessons in

More about The Igbo Tribe

Open Document