Immigration Changes In America

1204 Words5 Pages
Immigration is the act of coming to live in a foreign country. Immigration has changed in many ways over the past decades. Although it has changed drastically, it still remains the same in some ways. Almost all of the immigrants come here to pursue the “American Dream” and have better lives for them and their families back in their countries of origin. Whenever there is an opportunity to work they don’t think about it twice and go for it. They don’t have much focus whether they get paid much or minimum wage. As long as they can provide for their family and pay their bills, they will be more than happy. Some of these reasonings are why many Americans don’t like the Immigrants that come to the United States of America. They think that the immigrants…show more content…
They only focus on what they believe to be the “Bad” side of the immigrants. Another thing that many Americans don’t put much focus on is that the immigrants have helped the economy in so many ways that they don’t realize. Immigration has changed drastically over the past decades even a century ago. In 1790 the Naturalization Act was established. This Act “Excluded non-white people from eligibility to naturalize. Naturalization requirements included two years of residence in the country and “good moral character,” and an applicant must be a “free white person.” The Naturalization Act of 1795 extended the residency requirement to five years. In 1798, this was extended to 14 years, then back to five in 1802”(Cohn).…show more content…
This patrol was set to protect the border in between inspection stations. Later on the following year the agencies expand their patrolling to the seacoasts as well(Cohn). In 1943 the Magnuson Act was established. This Act was also known as “Chinese Exclusion Repeal Act of 1943”. This Act repealed the “Chinese Exclusion Act” that was established in 1882. This same Act established a quota of an estimate of about 105 Chinese immigrants per year. The Chinese residents, that had already lived there before this Act was established, were eligible to be naturalized(Cohn). The “Refugee Relief Act” of 1953 “Authorized special non-quota visas for more than 200,000 refugees and allowed these immigrants to become permanent residents”(Cohn). “The 1976 amendments to the 1965 law included the Western Hemisphere in the preference system and the 20,000 per year visa limits. This mostly affected Mexico at the time since it was the only Western Hemisphere country that substantially exceeded 20,000 visas annually. In 1978, an amendment to the law established a worldwide limit of 290,000 visas annually. This removed the prior Eastern and Western hemisphere caps”(Cohn). In 1986 the “Immigration Reform and Control Act” “Granted a pathway
Open Document