The Women's Rights Movement

1180 Words5 Pages
For decades in America’s past, the voices of women and minorities has been marginalized by those who are viewed as more important or significant. In this case, the overpowering voice derives from the white, male gender. Ever since the Renaissance, gender roles have defined the niches for women and men. Women were expected to stay home, care for the children, cook, and clean. On the other hand, men were responsible for working, providing money for the family and making the ultimate household decisions. Courageous women such as Susan B. Anthony, Francis Wright, Ernestine Rose, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton created a movement to approach the way women were portrayed as weak and inferior. The combined efforts of these female activists still interests…show more content…
Within his writing, he discusses the different books, letters, speeches from many influential women’s rights activists. The Seneca Falls convention was a turning point. Women such as Sarah Grimké and Margaret Fuller documented the segregation women were faced with by writing novels. Within their works, Fuller and Grimké both fight for equality between men and women. The women’s rights activists began holding national convention meetings, while also having meetings at state and local levels. Male abolitionist partnered with these powerful women and started joining their conventions. Within the 1860’s, more organizations and conventions began to make their appearance. For example, the Woman’s Loyal National League and the American Equal Rights Association. However, disagreements between the focus of the groups led to a divide. Engal dives deeper into novels written about women's suffrage and the movements to end viewing of women as weak and inferior. Engal further discusses how the women's rights movements and suffrage continuously had an impact fictional novels. It also shaped the way stories were portrayed when they talked about southerners compared to…show more content…
Many feminists in the 1800’s advocated for equality between women and men. Some of these advocates switched their beliefs from equality of men and women to the equality based on skin color and gender. Although female led organizations in the 1800’s shared differences, ultimately they were advocating for the same goals. Their ideal equality included political, social and economical. They strived to gain the rights to vote, to stop being viewed as weak and inferior in the eyes of man, and equal representation. Advocates such as these women only paved the way for future activists such as Rosa Parks. Within the fight for equality, male advocates such as Frederick Douglass joined the fight to ensure equality for blacks and women. The female voice is no longer marginalized to the extremities as it was in the 1800’s. However, there are still hardships women face every day. Gender roles are no longer portrayed the same as how they were expressed in these articles. Women are now able to vote and have equal representation in
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