The Importance Of Agriculture

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Agriculture is the science or occupation of farming. It is very important since based on research, 60% of the economic resources came from agriculture and 40% in industrial. It has already made a significant contribution to the economic prosperity of advanced countries and its role in the economic development of less developed countries is of vital importance. The agriculture sector is the backbone of an economy which provides the basic ingredients to mankind and now raw material for industrialization. Therefore, the role of agriculture for the development of an economy were this: contribution to national income, source of food supply, pre-requisite for raw material, provision of surplus, shift of manpower, creation of infrastructure, relief…show more content…
It is where the final products play the very important role so that the production will be a success. And the agriculture itself will come along. Most of the products or raw materials came produce by the existence of agriculture. Agriculture as involving cultivation of land, raising and rearing of animals for the purpose of providing food for man, feed for animals and raw materials for industries. It involves forestry, fishing, processing and marketing of these agricultural products. Let’s say in farming, the rice, the root crops and many more can be for sale for a production. And in fishing, the fishes and other sea foods as well as in other categories of agriculture can be…show more content…
Many rural people in the developing world are poor, and conversely, most of the world's poor people inhabit rural areas. Agriculture also accounts for a significant fraction of the economic activity in the developing world, with some 25% of value added in poor countries coming from this sector. The sheer size of the agricultural sector implies that changes affecting agriculture have large aggregate effects. Thus, it seems reasonable that agricultural productivity growth should have significant effects on macro variables, including economic growth. But these effects can be complicated. The large size of the agricultural sector does not necessarily imply that it must be a leading sector for economic growth. In fact, agriculture in most developing countries has very low productivity relative to the rest of the economy. Expanding a low-productivity sector might not be unambiguously good for growth. Moreover, there are issues of reverse causation. Economies that experience growth in aggregate output could be the beneficiaries of good institutions or good fortune that also helps the agricultural sector. Thus, even after 50 years of research on agricultural development, there is abundant evidence for correlations between agricultural productivity increases and economic growth but little definitive evidence for a causal
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