The Importance Of Christopher Columbus Day

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"All journeys have secret destinations of which the traveler is unaware." Martin Buber Even though Christopher Columbus Day is an important day in the discovery of the Indigenous people in the Americas by Europeans, Columbus never actually set foot in the United States. Columbus never intended to travel to the Americas; he was unaware of his destination. For this reason, we should not celebrate Columbus Day in the United States. The myth that Columbus discovered a new world has led to Columbus Day promoting an inaccurate telling of the United States ' history. Additionally, Celebration of Columbus Day deflects from the unfair and cruel humanitarian treatment of the Indigenous people during that period of history. If instead of celebrating Columbus…show more content…
To this point, should today 's Americans not acknowledge the good and bad accomplishments of Christopher Columbus? For many, celebrating Columbus is a way of remembering Columbus ' achievements and celebrating their Italian-American legacy. Additionally, to Columbus ' credit, he might not have discovered the new world or been the perfect humanitarian, but he did introduce the Columbian Exchange. The Columbian Exchange was perhaps one of the biggest major developments of Columbus ' journeys before the Columbian Exchange many of the farm animals, and agricultural crops in the Americas were inaccessible by the rest of the world by fear of exploration of the unknown. Columbus and the travelers that trailed him altered all that. From Europe explores brought various farm animals, some examples included chickens, cattle, and horse to the Americas and returned to Europe with different vegetables, for example, items like tomatoes, potatoes and various other species that had never been introduced to Europe. This exchange transformed both the Americas and Europe, according to Loewen. When Europeans introduced horses to the Indigenous people, it would go on to change the Indigenous people 's culture; this permitted them to move more freely…show more content…
We would be honoring people who believed they were doing the right thing by accepting and receiving the Europeans with open arms when they landed on their beaches. From the first moment the Taino and Arawark saw Columbus’ ship and the other ships, they welcomed the European settlers; they taught the settlers about agriculture and farming, and what it took the new settlers to survive in their new home. The indigenous people never presented any danger to the European settlers. In fact, the Indigenous people had no jails or any criminals, all the Indigenous people lived in harmony. After Columbus arrived, Indigenous people reminded resilient and tried to intercultural into the new settlers way of life by learning the settlers language. Even in 1620 when the English settlers arrived in Plymouth they were aided by the Indians. The American Tradition stated that “After some exploring the Pilgrims chose the land around Plymouth Harbor for their settlement…aided by friendly Indians, who gave them food and showed them how to grow corn. When warn weather came, the colonist planted, fished, hunted, and prepared themselves for the next
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