The Importance Of Clause 3 Clauses

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This section specifically lists the powers that Congress has. They are distributed uniformly and the states cannot change it. The first and most important power involves taxes and controlling money. They can set taxes, tariffs, and other methods of federal revenue, and control the spending of federal funds. However, these taxes must be uniform and equal throughout the U.S. The tax power is listed first because it was one of the biggest problems in the Articles of Confederation. Clause 2 Congress also has the power to borrow money by issuing bonds. It is okay for them to go into debt in order to pay for government programs and services. The U.S. is obliged to pay off those debts. Clause 3 This clause states that Congress has the ability to…show more content…
Habeas corpus means that the jailer must justify the prisoner’s unlawful imprisonment to court. In this clause, a writ of habeas corpus cannot be suspended because it is a fundamental civil liberty. However, if the case involves rebellion or invasion, then habeas corpus may be required. Clause 3 This clause talks about a bill of attainder and an ex post facto law. A bill of attainder is when the legislature convicts a criminal guilty, and they don’t have an advantage with a trial. Sometimes, it is used in the British Parliament, however, the Founding Fathers have banned them because they violated our liberty. An ex post facto law is when someone has already committed a certain act, and this law makes that action illegal. Both the bill of attainder and the ex post facto law cannot be passed. Clause 4 This clause involves a capitation/direct tax, which is a fixed tax that is based on the state’s population and census (apportionment rule). These taxes are must not be laid, and since the 16th amendment, it has created a new income tax system that has made it more personal. Clause…show more content…
Without congressional permission, any government official can’t accept a noble nor office title, or gift, from another country/government. This is set to prevent foreign corruption over the U.S. government. Section 10: States’ Limits Clause 1 This section limits the power of states and what they can do. They can’t enter into a treaty, alliance, or Confederation with a foreign country, hire pirates (“Letter of Marque”), print money, release credit bills, produce nothing but gold and silver coins, pass bills of attainder or ex post facto laws, pass laws that impairs the duties of contracts, and grant nobility titles. All of this ensures that individual states maintain their independence and responsibilities. Clause 2 States cannot charge tariffs on imported or exported goods from different states to raise revenue and regulate commerce, unless there is approval by Congress. Clause 3 States can’t create an army, or keep warships during peace, nor can they engage in war unless there is invasive danger or unless Congress
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