Climate Change: A Global Analysis

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Climate change is defined as the change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns lasting for a long period of time. This change can be caused by a wide array of factors which include solar radiation, plate tectonics and volcanic eruptions. Furthermore, climate change can be a result of varied human actions resulting to global warming. A number of research studies done both by private institutions and government-led agencies in various countries worldwide have already been published for the purpose of extensively reaching out to the world leaders to act accordingly and immediately. Of all the results concerning climate change, credible research studies point out that the most significant contributory factors are human activities…show more content…
This change is alarming rapid in nature. Global sea level rose considerably and might even double in the next coming years. Disturbingly, other observable changes are rising global temperature, warming oceans, shrinking ice sheets, declining arctic sea ice, glacial retreat, extreme events, ocean acidification, and decreased snow cover. These pressing issues have to be addressed holistically right away. In order to better understand how countries could work hand in hand to look into the issues of climate change, its long-term adverse effects worldwide, and the possible solutions, it is inevitable to analyze it using theories concerning international relations which are defined as an interdisciplinary academic field similar to global studies or an entirely independent academic…show more content…
Constructivism emphasizes that socially constructed characters and structures of human association are shaped by the shared human ideas and not by material aspects. This international relations theory presupposes that individuals are responsible in the kind of world they live in. Social realities are end results of human actions and interventions. How humans think, interact, socialize, and cooperate with one another dictates how to arrive at common grounds. It is thus posited that “Constructivism is a structural theory of the international system that makes the following core claims: (1) states are the principal units of analysis for international political theory; (2) the key structures in the states system are intersubjective rather than material; and (3) state identities and interests are in important part constructed by these social structures”, Behravesh 2011. Among the abovementioned schools of thoughts concerning international relations, constructivism seemingly offers the most suitable and feasible solutions in order to address the issues of climate change and its adverse long-term effects since cooperation among nations guided not by material and power factors by “discursive power and ideational elements”, Khan 2016. One salient question concerning the
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