Identity Role Confusion

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Adolescence, often epitomized by identity conflict and formation are influenced largely by the dominant cultural discourse and media exposure. The transition between childhood and adulthood constitutes’ both physical and cognitive changes, and from their immensity - is an integral influence upon the development of the identity. Humans’, being inherently “products’ of our context” are socialised by the dominant cultural discourse; media exposure, shifts’ perspectives’ on this cultural discourse, reciprocally shaping identity. From the adolescent need for “identity achievement”, and conformity as iterated by Judith Ruth Harris, dependence on popular culture intake only increases. Alongside contemporary society 's’ increasing dependence on media,…show more content…
Dominant cultural discourses alike misogyny, white supremacy and xenophobic sentiments infiltrate all spectrums of society, and as a consequence - identity Whether manifested through unconscious or conscious bias, these indoctrinated notions cloud judgements. In Erikson 's’ psychosocial theory, adolescents’ falls into the “Identity VS Role Confusion” stage, which theorizes that before the acquisition of “identity achievement”, role confusion is rampant - often manifested through conformity. Harris examines that within social groups, individual assimilation to group norms is common, undoubtedly applicable to the macrocosmic sphere with widespread assimilation to behaviours’ reflecting dominant discourses. Influence upon the personal identity is irrefutable as individual biases are derivative of the cultural discourse, and are reciprocated through the social identity. Furthermore, as humans are essentially “products’ of their context”, dominant cultural discourses’ remain imperative in shaping…show more content…
Iterated by Singh “in this whole process of transformation, evolution, cultural identity…, it is media which is responsible for the change or shifts of dimensions in every sphere”, undoubtedly constituting both aspects’ of the identity. As medias transformative reach dismantles the dominant cultural discourse, the personal identity reconstructs’ new values, doctrines and foundations’. Contrarily, the social identity may still manifest elements of the dominant discourse as reinforced by Harris’ in-group assimilation, however as the outreach of media develops these behaviours are due to change and reach alignment between the identities.” The dichotomies between these influences serve to identify the complexity of the adolescent experience and identify formation. Media; being a “multi-discursive space” and a “global forum for vox populi”, influences adolescent identity formation in providing a comprehensive and multifaceted approach to complex affairs. The influence of media, upon cultural foundations, facilitates for challenging discussion, allowing one to develop understanding and further grow individual opinions’ and socio-political perspectives. Conclusively, despite the contradictory state of the dominant discourse and media exposure – both influences work cohesively in creating holistic
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