The Importance Of Decent Work

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The overall goal of Decent Work is to effect positive change in people’s lives at the national and local levels. The ILO provides support through integrated Decent Work Country Programmes developed in coordination with ILO constituents. They define the priorities and the targets within national development frameworks and aim to tackle major Decent Work deficits through efficient programmes that embrace each of the strategic objectives. The ILO operates with other partners within and beyond the UN family to provide in-depth expertise and key policy instruments for the design and implementation of these programmes. It also provides support for building the institutions needed to carry them forward and for measuring progress. The balance within…show more content…
Labour inspectors examine how national labour standards are applied in the workplace and advise employers and workers on how to improve the application of national law in such matters as working time, wages, occupational safety and health, and child labour. In addition, labour inspectors bring to the notice of national authorities loopholes and defects in national law. They play an important role in ensuring that labour law is applied equally to all employers and workers. Because the international community recognizes the importance of labour inspection, the ILO has made the promotion of the ratification of two labour inspection conventions (Nos. 81 and 129) a priority. To date, more than 130 countries (over 70% of ILO member states) have ratified the Labour Inspection Convention, 1947 (No. 81), and more than 40 have ratified Convention No.…show more content…
It sets out a series of principles respecting the determination of the fields of legislation covered by labour inspection, the functions and organizations of the system of inspection, recruitment criteria, the status and terms and conditions of service of labour inspectors, and their powers and obligations. Protocol of 1995 to the Labour Inspection Convention, 1947 (No. 81) - [ratifications ] Each state that ratifies this protocol shall extend the application of the provisions of the Labour Inspection Convention, 1947 (No. 81) to workplaces considered as non-commercial, which means neither industrial nor commercial in the sense of the convention. It also allows ratifying states to make special arrangements for the inspection of enumerated public services. Labour Inspection (Agriculture) Convention, 1969 (No. 129) - [ratifications
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