History Of Drama

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Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance. The term "drama" comes from a Greek word meaning "action, which is derived from ‘I do’. Drama is considered a type of literature telling story, which is intended to be an audience on the stage. Talk in learning is not a one-way linear communication but a reciprocal process in which ideas are bounced back and forth and on that basis take children’s thinking forward (Alber,2003) . Ideas can be shared first with a partner, a teaching assistant or small group; after a little more time, the quieter child will feel able to speak in front of the whole class. Review times during a teaching session, help everyone to clarify their thoughts and ideas and frequently spur on those children…show more content…
Furthermore, Roman comedies and tragedies were performed at festivals which were known as temple dedications, triumphal parades and funerals of roman aristrocrates.In the late fifth century until the tenth century, the drama was essentially dead due to the roman’s lack of interest in dramas. The English renaissance, a cultural and artistic movement in England from 16th to early 17th century played an important part. It paved the way for the dominance of drama in country. Queen Elizabeth 1 ruled during the period. The renowned writers of this time were Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson and John Webster. They wrote plays based on themes like history, comedy and tragedy. Shakespeare emerged as an artist who produced plays based on all three themes. Modern drama started in the early part of the 20th century. Musical drama came to dominate stages in New York and England. The majority of musical dramas of the 20th century were written by Andrew Lloyd Webber. His work gained immense popularity. The dramas traveled to broadways in New York and around the world. Some of them were turned into features films as…show more content…
Drama can be defined as activity involving people in a social context and there is no doubt that effective communication in social situations involves other forms of communication that go beyond language competence and includes the use of gesture, body posture, intonation and other prosodic features. However the presence of drama based activities is not so evident in current ELT course books, resource books, supplementary materials and teacher training courses. Wright et al (2007) states that in addition to motivation, drama allows learners to think in more sophisticated ways. It could be concluded that integrating drama in ESL/EFL classes would increase language learning, enhance motivation and reduce anxiety among
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