Early Child Development Analysis

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Child development is the foundation on which early childhood practices are based upon. Because the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and language developmental domains are all related, early childhood professionals in all types of programs, including kindergarten, daycare providers and even parents should comprehend both the processes of development and the adult’s role in the support of each child’s growth, development, and learning. Throughout the years, there have been a number of theories on how young children develop and the best way to. There have also been milestones that have been documented that determine where a child should be developmentally as well as strategies that are helpful and facilitate best practices to assist…show more content…
During this time, children are building on the base of skills that have been developed during early childhood and are now moving forward to being more independent, both intellectually and emotionally. This stage is when caregivers should know what milestones to be looking for when evaluating their students. When looking for developmental milestones during this period, knowing what to expect as the children grow, can reassure you that the children are on track with their peers or alert the caregiver to potential concerns or delays in development (Destefanis & Firchow, 2015). Some specific milestones that may be looked for in motor development are being able to ride a bike by the age of six and can move in coordinated rhythm with music or a beat, dress themselves, and tie their shoes. Some milestones in regards to language and thinking development are that the children may seem to be very curious and ask many…show more content…
Because it is hard to participate in social developing activities of play without talking to peers or classmates, language development is usually a common secondary part of this development area. Children use more words and complex sentences during play than they do in other types of classroom activities (Cohen & Uhry, 2007). The sheer practice of language in play is likely to promote communicative competence. Another theory to explain the contributions of movement to language is more basic (Iverson, 2010). When children move, according to this perspective, they act out, with their bodies, the structure and meaning words and sentences. Children who are throwing a ball are essentially making physical statements that include all the grammatical parts of a sentence. When they intentionally cause an event to occur with their movements, they are physically making a causal statement: “When you throw the ball hard, it goes really far.” When children move through a tunnel, under a climber, or over a bridge, they are physically expressing prepositions. In other words, movement may lay the foundation for understanding of word meaning and syntax. The relationship between language and physical action can be strengthened, from this view, when adults overlay words and phrases across children’s activities (Iverson,
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