The English Language Analysis

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English Language and literacy has changed through time (Centre for Innovation - Leiden University., TEDx Talks, 2014). History has not always placed all humans equally when it comes to language, in some cultures the powerful, such as kings and noble men, produced the language and everyday people such as the peasants were forced to listen (Gee & Hayes, 2011., Ted-Ed, 2012). The hierarchy of the middle ages dictated who had the authority to speak and who should listen (Gee & Hayes, 2011., Ted-Ed, 2012). Oral language has been around since humans evolved, however, when written language was created 3000-8000 years ago it represented a challenge for authority (Gee & Hayes, 2011). When someone speaks they can easily be silenced, however, the written…show more content…
Since the English language began countries that adopt the language have been adapting it to make it their own, taking as little as a few weeks for a new type of English to grow (BritishCouncilSerbia, 2013). The English language is adapted to suit different circumstances and to be able to talk about conditions that are unique to the geographical region (BritishCouncilSerbia, 2013). One example of this is South African English, with 10, 000 words that are exclusively used in South African English, some of these words may come from other languages present in the country at the time, these are known as loan words (BritishCouncilSerbia, 2013). Another example of geographical differences in English is how slang is used, for example, the word ‘like’ as explained by Sociolinguist Vera Regan in TEDx Talks, (2014). Vera Regan states Irish English, uses ‘like’ clause marginal, at the beginning or the end, whereas Australians, British and Canadians, use clause medial, where the word ‘Like’ is used in the middle of the sentence (TEDx Talks, 2014). In Australia, geographical differences in English occur in the form of Australian Standard English (ASE) and Aboriginal English (Fellowes & Oakley,…show more content…
In remote areas of the Kimberley, Indigenous Australian children can be exposed to various languages such as traditional languages, Aboriginal English and Standard Australian English (Scull & Raban, 2016-a)National literacy results show there are gaps between Indigenous and non indigenous literacy skills, one reason for this could be due to the way language is learnt, which is culturally dictated by the dominant society groups (Green, 2006., Scull & Raban, 2016-a). The languages that Indigenous children grow up with are different to the language used in the school environment (Scull & Raban, 2016-a). In Aboriginal English fewer words are used, the listener is responsible for concluding meaning, people are spoken to differently depending on their kinship, silence holds special meaning and facial expression indicates manner (Fellowes & Oakley, 2014). Teachers must understand the importance of Aboriginal Englishes for indigenous students in social and conversational situations (Scull & Raban, 2016-a). They should also get to know their student 's cultural backgrounds as apart of their culture, is their language and communication customs, this will help cultivate the student 's identity and self esteem (Fellowes & Oakley, 2014). How, when, and where different cultures such as
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