Environmental Issues In Environmental Education

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1.0 Introduction Environment has influenced and shaped our lives since the time immemorial. It is from the environment that gets the food to eat, water to drink, air to breathe and all the necessities of day today life, thus constituting it as a life support system. Through the process of natural selection and elimination it is environment only which has caused the evolution of biological spectrum, the biosphere as it exists today. Today environment has become the concern of all; the academicians, intellectuals, scientists, policymakers and government across the continents (Kant and Sharma, 2013) For the first time in his entire cultural history man is facing one of the most horrible ecological crisis example, the problem of pollution of his…show more content…
Environmental concerns are to be brought in all subject area rather than to introduce a mare new subject. It is therefore to be clearly understood that environment and development are not contradictory to each other, but there is a need of ‘Holistic Development’ example taking the process of development and environment as a unit. People should be persuaded to adopt environment friendly life style. Information should be properly passed on to the grass root level for real action to happen. Environmental education should lead for gathering mass awareness which should bring environmentally wiser policies. Thus, in order to protect and conserve the environment, enabling people to lead quality life due emphasis has to be given to environmental education in both formal and non formal system of educations Sundaravalli…show more content…
In 2010/11, England produced 23.2 million tons of household waste, a decrease of 2.1% compared to 2007/08 (Defra, 2011b). On average, 40.8% of household waste has been recycled or composted, represented the best ever performance of waste management in England (Defra, 2011b). Nevertheless, the landfill diversion rate is still lower than that in many other European Union countries, such as the Netherlands, Austria, and Belgium which all achieved rates of more than 50% (Eurostat, 2009). The Waste Strategy 2007 for England establishes the minimum targets of household waste recycling or composting at 40% by 2010, 45% by 2015, and 50% by 2020, respectively (Defra, 2007a). It is obvious that effective, proper waste management strategies must be continually developed if England is to increase its landfill diversion rates and to catch up with other neighbor EU
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