The Resurgence Of Feminism Analysis

1673 Words7 Pages
The period of the late sixties onwards is seen to mark the resurgence in the prominence of the feminist movement. Feminism may refer to political, cultural or economic activism establishing change regarding socioeconomic or governmental gender issues. As Joanne Hollows argues, there is no standardised definition of ‘feminism,’ however believes it is clear that the revival of feminism in the sixties and seventies, also known as ‘second wave feminism’ “did not simply seek to explain the inequalities between men and women but to use this as a basis for change.” The feminist revival built up momentum following the recovery from the Second World War, and it is through an amalgamation of social and intellectual factors that revival was maintained…show more content…
We can gather that the influence of prominent figures such as Eleanor Roosevelt also helped to mark the resurgence of sixties feminism and its importance as an issue. The former first lady was asked to head up a new Commission on the Status of Women by President John F Kennedy, which held the audience of high ranking officials in the American government. Throughout the period, multiple organisations and factions were formed, with most British towns home to their own women’s liberation groups, altering the way in which women regarded themselves and each other. Since its formation, women played a vital role in the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, with a woman as its organising secretary. The Women’s Liberation Movement was formed, it’s first national conference occurring in 1970. Whilst initially acting as a conference for women’s history, the enthusiasm of activists caused it to amend its purpose into focusing on women’s issues. The conference discussed matters ranging from the…show more content…
Mediums such as autobiographies, newsletters, magazines and storytelling were vital in creating the foundations for the developing recognition of women’s voices outside the spheres of literature. These publications played a crucial role in circulating feminist concepts and influencing society, a point supported by contemporary Michael Mack that the effect of “literature persuades us to cope with change.” A key publication was The Feminine Mystique, published in the 1960s by Betty Freidan, which explained how the domestic stereotype expected of women ultimately restricted their happiness and fulfilment. Despite modern criticisms of the books’ limitations from third wave feminists, the book was considered a critical turning point in the revival of second wave feminism. The Feminine Mystique sold millions of copies and became a bestselling nonfiction book. This indicates to us the large-scale influence that the book held on culture and society, the work provoking women into considering their selfhood and positions, even being referred to as “a catalyst for change" by modern day feminist Eleanor Smeal. Additionally, another example was the feminist magazine Spare Rib, which provided readers with a critical analysis of sexual oppression as well as other relevant concepts; the magazine confronting issues and dilemmas
Open Document