The Importance Of Indigenous Knowledge

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1.0 Introduction There are two major types of knowledge, tacit and explicit (Collins, 2010; Becerra, Becerra, Lunnan & Huemer, 2008). Tacit knowledge is the intangible knowledge held by a person. It comprises subjective know-how, insights and intuitions (Becerra et al., 2008).). Explicit knowledge is referred to as tangible knowledge. This is held in the form of text, reports, equations, formulae and specifications (Dhanaraj et al., 2004). It is usually recorded or codified. Explicit knowledge is largely entrenched in the culture and traditions of individuals or communities (Dalkir, 2013). Indigenous knowledge is classified as the tangible knowledge. This is easily shared hence may require copyright protection. 1.1 Background to the Study…show more content…
NEMA also reveals the various laws and policies that lay the foundation for the implementation of programmes related to indigenous knowledge (Speranza et al., 2010). These include: National Policy on National Heritage and Culture; Traditional Medicine and Medicinal Plants by the Ministry of Planning and National Development; Legislation on IK folklore, Genetic Resources by the Attorney General (AG) Chambers; and The NEMA Act, Sections 43, 50f and 51f (Redley et al,…show more content…
Despite emerging interests in indigenous knowledge, not enough has been done to preserve and manage indigenous knowledge and property in Kenya. The recognition, protection and appreciation of indigenous knowledge and property are very crucial at national level. As Lesser (2012) observes, the current Intellectual Property Rights system in Kenya does not adequately recognize or protect the rights of indigenous people and local communities with respect to their knowledge and innovations. Regardless of various studies on and interests in Indigenous knowledge and property in Kenya, the issue of its protection is poorly addressed. There is no comprehensive legal provision for Indigenous knowledge and property in Kenya. Kenya has only two legal provisions partly cover Indigenous knowledge and property, these being the protection of folklore under copyright law and utility model provisions that protect indigenous inventions. This states that an invention only qualifies for a utility model certificate if it is new and/or industrially applicable. This poses various challenges to Indigenous knowledge and properties like the kiondo and
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