The Meaning Of Job Design

1935 Words8 Pages
Job range, depth, and relationships fall under the term job design. According to Ivancevich, Konopaske, and Matteson (2014), “A major cause of effective job performance is job design, which refers to the process by which managers decide what job tasks and how much authority each employee will have” (p.141). Job design by management determines the well-being of their employees and the organization. A job has pros and cons just like anything else. Jobs can be stressful mentally, physically, and emotionally but at the same time jobs provide income, purpose, and relationships with others. While we have to understand the meaning of work design, we also have to understand the meaning of job resign and what it means within an organization. Ivancevich,…show more content…
Ivancevich, Konopaske, and Matteson discussed, “The concept of quality of work life (QWL) is widely used to refer to “a philosophy of management that enhances the dignity of all workers; introduces changes in an organization’s culture; and improves the physical and emotional well-being of employees” (p.143). A healthy work design promotes growth and development within an organization. Quality of life in an organization entails paid time off (PTO), sick time, stress, and a number of other things. QWL is intended to promote overall productivity and satisfaction with employees and the organization. Job design attempts to accomplish two goals. The first goal is to recognize the most vital needs for the organization and the employees. The second goal is to diminish barriers in the organization that hinders these needs. Management has full control over job designs. Designing jobs is not an easy task but if managers want productive employees and organizations they will have to learn what job design entails. The general model for job design exhibits job design that feeds into perceived job content which has individual differences and social setting differences feeding into it and that leads to job…show more content…
Such outcomes typically are thought to be solely in the province of professional and technical jobs; yet all jobs potentially have opportunities for intrinsic outcomes. Extrinsic outcomes, however, are objects or events that follow from the workers’ own efforts in conjunction with other factors or persons not directly involved in the job itself. Pay, working conditions, co-workers, and even supervision are objects in the workplace that are potentially job outcomes, but that aren’t a fundamental part of the work. Dealing with others and friendships interactions are sources of extrinsic outcomes.
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