The Importance Of Knowledge In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Knowledge can be a good thing if we use it in a good way, but if you don’t use it wisely it can bring many problems and it might also bring bad consequences. In Frankenstein’s case knowledge was not a good thing. The book Frankenstein, or, The modern Prometheus, by Mary Shelley, was a very intriguing story with many comparisons of the ultimate powers in life. It contained many topics of our everyday life today. Even though it contained many themes of our everyday life, mainly it consisted of knowledge can lead to bad things. In Frankenstein, Mary Shelley makes the theme evident with knowledge in the characters development. Reading the novel Frankenstein makes the word knowledge may pop into ones head throughout the text. The Webster’s dictionary defines the word knowledge as, “Understanding gained by actual experience; range of information; clear perception of truth; something learned and kept in the mind” (Merriam-Webster Dictionary). In…show more content…
Mary Shelly provides examples throughout the text of the many ways to acquire knowledge and surveys how the characters succeed and fail in their journey for knowledge. The story of Frankenstein shows how someone’s life can be destroyed by their desire for knowledge. This provides a great example of what can happen when people take desires too far, without considering or thinking ahead to the possible consequences of their actions. One may learn a lot from reading this crazy story. One may have to take a moment and ask, if or whenever working in the area of technology, whose interests might one have in mind? How might these evolutions possibly affect thy society? What possible harms could ones establishment cause? The most important question one may ask is how willing one may be to sacrifice in profit for knowledge? You will never know if the outcome will be good or bad unless you take your time to
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