M Zab's Architecture Analysis

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According to Hadji Bouchama, Arab-Islamic art had the potential to inspire infinite harmonious reverberation, making it possible for it to be used as a source of inspiration for future generations. In 1980, Bouchama wrote an article in a French magazine arguing about the need to preserve architectural functionality even in the face of high technology and other contemporary means of architectural design (Bouchair & Dupagne, 2003). From his point of view, it was important to integrate modern technology into architecture as a discipline. However, his aim was not to change the overall design, but to allow for traditional architecture to adapt to new technology. Since traditional M’zab’s architecture involved a significant but unique level of decoration…show more content…
According to this architect, the main factor that caught his eye was not the nature of M’zab’s traditional architecture. Rather, it was its ability to bring out concepts that can be used even in modern times (Ravereau, 2007). While other architects saw this traditional form of architectural design as a hindrance to contemporary and modern architecture in the face of industrial civilization, Andre perceived it differently. According to Ravereau, new practices could achieve a lot from M’zab’s architecture. Additionally, this architect also recognized the completeness of this environment especially due to the fact that Mozabites had managed to create architecture that had the ability to adapt through the environmental constraints brought about by different seasons (Ali-Toudert et al., 2005). From his perspective, this architectural layout and design had the potential to fuse urbanism with respect to the environment. This is why he decided to revive this traditionally functional form of architecture by fusing it with new practices (Baydar,…show more content…
Ravereau noticed that modern technology would eventually erode the rich heritage that this Algerian town held. He opened a workshop and this workshop’s main aim was to act as a learning ground for his younger successors as well as future generations even after he left M’zab (Ravereau & Roche, 2003). M’zab contained a basic architectural approach, something that fascinated Ravereau. He noticed that all aspects of architectural prestige and unnecessary influence had been sacrificed for egalitarian communal living. Traditional designers managed to build private houses with dams and mosques for each section of the community, leaving out defence and the environment as the only problems (Ali-Toudert et al., 2005). However, through their architecture, they managed to adapt to seasonal changes which is the only aspect of the environment they had no influence
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