The Importance Of Morality

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Morality “derives from the Latin moralis meaning customs or manners” (Thiroux 1). Many people in today's society often connect the idea of “people being ethical or moral to mean good or right and unethical and immoral to mean wrong or bad” (Thiroux 1). In regards to morality, people “do not conceive it in such an abstract and universal form” (Kant 21). Morals can be specified and altered in different cultures and through experiences. Morality can be developed throughout a person's lifetime, as there are no set universal morals in place. Society and policy can alter morals in an attempt to control people's actions. In fact, it can even impact a person's individual identity, in America, “Individual identity is connected to guilt and objective…show more content…
However, the importance of the acknowledgment of morality is extremely important as morality impacts society in numerous ways. Morality is culturally conditioned and is enhanced with the use of learned situational ethics and the exercise of free will. Morality is changed/shaped based on cultural backgrounds and family beliefs. Geuss explains that “‘morality’ encompasses a wide variety of different sorts of things that are at best connected to each other by ‘family resemblances’” (Geuss 167). According to Tabellini, there are “large differences in the scope of application of norms of good conduct across different societies” (Tabellini 260). Tabellini also concludes that “codes of good conduct and honest behavior are often confined to small circles of related people” (Tabellini 260), such as a family, political group, or…show more content…
Carey introduces that “[p]erhaps free will belief encourages a stricter form of universal morality” (139). Without free will, “there can be no sense of moral responsibility” (Carey 135). Free will, therefore moral responsibility as well, would result in the Nietzsche's claim that free will was implemented for the “purpose of punishment” (Nietzsche 355), which will also “impute guilt” (Nietzsche 355). In Careys study, it was found that “free will believers call for harsher criminal punishment” (Carey 135-136). Free will can influence universal morality. Free will can implement a stricter and more rigid form of morality. Without the influence of free will, the need for moral responsibility is absent. Nietzsche believes that free will was created to punish and impute guilt upon people. Free will was not created for that sole purpose but Nietzsche's belief is true. Free will allows people to make their own moral decisions based on what they believe. Free will also creates a standard and moral responsibility for people to conform to. Free will causes people to hold themselves and others more responsible for their actions, as they agree that harsh consequences should follow if moral rules are broken. Free will encourages people to take responsibility for their moral actions and the potential consequences encourage more positive moral
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