Persuasive Language Techniques

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Their aim is to convey a particular point of view, be it justifying an issue or the promotion of a product in the market, there are many key features belonging to a successful piece of persuasive writing. An appropriate and well informed argument is an essential part of this genre. They often begin with a statement of position in relation to the main subject of the argument, followed by a logical sequence in which the argument is put forward with the use of evidence. The use of cause and effect is important and influential within the argument of this text, as it connects the action to what it leads to and enables the audience to fully understand the extent of the issue. Graphics may also be included in order to devise a much stronger argument…show more content…
“Repetition of key points” (Lecture notes) It's mostly written in the present tense but this may vary if the writer/speaker is relating to evidence from the past/ attempting to make predictions. The utilisation of pronouns (I, we, us) cleverly manipulates the reader, making them feel as if they are part of the greater community and encouraging them to agree with the position argued. eg. We all know that smoking causes cancer so should not smoke. Likewise the use of a passive voice can be advantageous as authority isn't over stamped and audience isn't belittled. eg. We would like to suggest that an enquiry be held into the running of the steel mills. Water is being polluted. Due to advantages of developing an emotional response from the audience, emotive language is a highly regarded part of the genre “will appeal to the reader's feelings, eg. concern, unreasonable, should.” It concludes with reiteration, summing up or restating the statement of position, with the use of conjunctions to exemplify results and finalise the…show more content…
The provision of a variety of persuasive texts will enable them to build an awareness of the common features of this genre by “Talking about the purpose, Identifying the possible intended audience, Drawing attention to the text organisation and Highlighting the type of language used.”I Will then continue to encourage the children to analyse different versions of a text with the multi-text model in mind. “Children are required to rank these samples by effectiveness. Then use the information gained from discussion to devise rules and frameworks for writing that form.” Proceeding to teach the conventions and strategies of the genre through modelled writing, in which “the teacher composing texts in front of the class, thinking aloud about what is being done and explaining decisions” (Evans 1991). Informing children on what content to include/omit, what language to use etc creating a purpose for the task. Having successfully done so I will then utilise ‘Shared writing’, consulting the children for ideas “Children volunteer parts of the story and the teacher writes it down on a flipchart or whiteboard, thus modelling the writing conventions.” Followed by Guided writing, in which the children would work in small groups or pairs, using their framework to plan their writing.Where appropriate, I may have the opportunity to conduct mini lessons, helping them to
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