The Importance Of Slavery In Frederick Douglass

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“While I was saddened by the thought of losing the aid of my kind mistress, I was gladdened by the invaluable instruction which, by the merest accident, I had gained from my master.” quoted Frederick Douglass. In that moment of the scene that 's where the role of literacy began. Once literacy is exposed to the slaves, they would become unmanageable for the slaveholders to handle. Slaves would then realize that the key to their freedom is literacy. Why is teaching slaves how to read and write is such a problem that slaveholders fear it? In the book, Douglass illustrates how literacy is a key component of revising a slave from the mental bonds of story. Chapter six, when Hugh Auld forbids Sophia Auld to stop giving Douglass writing and reading lessons is when Douglass learns that knowledge must be the way to freedom, while Auld believe education will ruin slaves. Without knowing it Aulds revealed a way for slaves to be free on how which whites manage to keep blacks as slaves so they can’t free themselves. Hugh didn 't want Douglass to be educated because he thought Douglass would become unmanageable and unfit to become a slave if he enters the world of literacy. What would happen if slaves are revealed to education? Why are slaveholders so big on not teaching slaves how to read and write? You start to raise questions and curiosity on finding out the answer. Frederick recalled “I now understood what had been to me a most perplexing difficulty to wit, the white man’s power
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