Common Sense In Sociology

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Oxford English Dictionaries defines common sense as, “Good sense and sound judgement in practical matters” (2018). However, according to the definition provided in the course study guide, common sense is merely “a type of knowledge that emerges in our social networks” (Sosteric 2015). Dr. Sosteric further explains that common sense is “our generally accepted opinions about things—what we ‘know’ to be true” and “our taken-for-granted ideas about the world” (2015). When considering common sense within the context of this sociological definition, we can understand it as an extension of ideology. This connection is possible because common sense explanations are often biased, uncontested, and circumscribe the possibility of query, objection, or…show more content…
I attempted to answer this question thoroughly, drawing on pre-acquired knowledge from other sociology courses and previous chapters within the textbook. My thought process when responding to this question involved exploring issues regarding the obvious power differentials surrounding inequality as an entirety and applying them to prostitution and pornography in Canada. As such, the disproportionate representation, exploitation, lower-income, and mistreatment of subordinate genders, races, classes, and sexual orientations working within the sex trade were salient discussion points in my answer. Whilst many of my considerations were affirmed upon completion of the reading assignment, the supplementary reasonings and additional perspectives provided me with far greater insight into the ways that these social problems correlate. Furthermore, this chapter introduced me to concepts that I would have otherwise been unaware of, regarding the topic of inequality within the sex trade. Although I was already conscious of choice-based prostitution often stemming from various inequalities, prior to reading this chapter, I was oblivious to the fact that sex trade itself encompassed hierarchal class-based tiers that closely resemble the social tier system already positioned in society. Moreover,…show more content…
In suggesting this method, I incorporated a firm belief in officers creating an increased ability to understand and engage with the diverse array of people that they are paid to serve and protect when a significant amount of knowledge and comprehension of cultural diversity is provided to them. Furthermore, I articulated that this approach would have a positive impact as it would reduce inequality within the criminal justice system and aid officers in their willingness to deliver justice to people from all walks of life. While the textbook did not confirm my approach was correct, I still feel as though a more thorough educational process would help to alleviate this specific social problem. In addition, this chapter did reaffirm my assumptions about many minority groups being subjected to institutionalized racism within the criminal justice system. This facet of the system was unveiled in the discussion on “carding” and the textbook provided a few answers to this problem, including a recount of the police board passed resolutions that manifested in April 2013. Further, the textbook drew attention to community-police liaison organizations and events to help reduce the divide
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