Spy Fiction In English Literature

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The aim of my diploma thesis was to sum up and give a general survey of information concerning the spy fiction genre, its rise, nature, features, development and examples of the spy novels representing authors. I think that all the gathered information in this diploma thesis can help readers to get a better view of such an interesting genre in English literature like spy fiction is. I am convinced that spy stories we have always had with us. Like everything else, they can be traced back to the Bible. Within the spy novel, we can find everything in the novel itself, from romance to bare realism, from junk to significant literature. Moreover espionage is becoming the reality which is closer to the average common man…show more content…
Phillips Oppenheim and the earlier and even less remembered William Le Queux. The trend of the unrealistic stream of glamour espionage to which Ian Fleming cling to the whole career carried through relatively a long time. Skillfully depicted with the elements both from literature and life, are the stories of John Buchan (The Thirty Nine Steps, 1915). Since the time of Buchan the British spy had begun to be presented with the elements of xenophobia. But the first stories of espionage with really realistic elements and character may be considered in “Ashenden: or the British Agent” (1928) written by Somerset Maugham, who himself was active for the Foreign Office during the…show more content…
And due to all these facts a spy novel could be created as full-valued as any other kind and form of fiction. Later with the approaching threat of WWII, a number of authors changed their topics and themes, and turned for the first time to depict international intrigues and politics. After the war and restoration of normal life situation the same writers returned to their usual themes
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