The Importance Of Student Leadership

1997 Words8 Pages
Student organizations are present in almost in every college across the country. These organizations engage student leaders in a constant process of organizational learning as students respond to a continuous stream of organizational challenges and questions. According to Astin (1984), the greater the amount of energy college students put into involvement with academic and extracurricular activities, the more successful they are likely to be in college. As is reflected in institutional mission statements, many colleges and universities place emphasis on outcomes specifically related to student leadership development (Miller, 2003; National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs, 2006), or reaching higher levels of developmental maturity in…show more content…
Since student leadership entails the ability to influence major decisions pertaining to education and learning environment, student leaders use their listening skills, valuing abilities and the brainstorming of ideas in the formulation of proposals for their organization(Rodriguez and Villareal, 2003). Leadership, as defined by McGreggor (2006), is about learning together. Student leaders must be able to share and at the same time generate ideas from subordinates to produce an action that will eventually benefit everyone. Through learning together and encouraging subordinates to work together, their focus is geared towards values formation rather than just role identification. Johnson and Johnson (1975) emphasized that goals are achieved only with the cooperation and coordination of others. However, Massallay (1990) accentuated that the success of any group depends on the ability of its members to exchange ideas freely and to feel involved in the life and decision of the group. With these in mind, a student leader should use several leadership skills in order to be an effective facilitator of cooperation within the student…show more content…
The cliché or saying “No man is an island” exemplifies the need for an individual to be involved in a group or community or to socialize. Even in the early stage of a child’s development, he has to undergo socialization and learn the fundamental social skills in order to survive in the future. In Erik Erickson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development, it highlights the importance of a person resolving a series of conflicts where interpersonal relationship plays a vital role. Among the stages of his Psychosocial Development theory, the adolescent stage or the age of “Identity vs Role Confusion” entails the need for the child to interact with peers and other people in order to establish his own identity in the society (Huitt and Dawson,
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