The Importance Of Teacher Evaluation

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Garnett is in her senior year of high school. She sat down at her desk and brushed her curly hair behind her shoulders. Her teacher passed out a form and she picked up her pencil and started filling it out. This class feels like a second home, the paper said. Arching an eyebrow, she chooses one of the answers from the list: never. In the past decade, education reformers worldwide have been obsessed with teaching quality. Study after study has shown that it matters more than anything else in a school and that it is too low in too many places. For all kids to learn 21st-century skills, teaching needs to be improved. In the United States, almost half of the states required teacher reviews to be based on some part of test-score data in the beginning…show more content…
Not all teachers are effective in teaching their lessons to their students. According to the legislation, “highly qualified” teachers are people who have at least a bachelor's degree, are fully licensed or certified by the state in the subjects they teach and can show competence in the subjects they teach. This factor will not determine whether or not a teacher is effective with their lessons. According to Pamela D. Tucker, author of Linking Teacher Evaluation and Student Learning, effective teachers are able to envision instructional goals for their students, then draw upon their knowledge and training to help students achieve success. What this means is that effective teachers know what to do to make their students learn and succeed while teaching a lesson. Since students would be the first-hand witnesses to “highly qualified” and “effective” teachers, an evaluation done by students would be a great advantage to their school, and…show more content…
According to Dr. Leon Robinson, one of the first five recognized by the SPE as a “Drilling Legend,” and gave annual lectures at in-house Drilling Engineering Schools on various topics, “Bad teachers are dull and uninspiring. Their lectures drone on and on, and before long it’s a struggle just to stay awake.” He continues on and tells us about his personal experiences in college with good and bad teachers. Dr. Robinson goes on to describe “effective” teachers as engaging, often entertaining, and fearless. He states, “They’ll do just about anything to hold a student’s attention and find a way to drive home an important principle. Even the most highly motivated students learn more, and retain more of what they learn when they are entertained.” Children would be able to provide inside information on whether or not their teacher is “good” or “bad.” The way we evaluate teachers now wouldn’t give correct information on whether a teacher is “good” or “bad.” As stated previously, the teacher evaluation that is done currently gives inaccurate information because a teacher can put on an act for the person who is evaluating them; the teachers can make it seem like they were “good” at teaching. As you can see, a teacher evaluation done by students would help get rid of the “bad” or “mean” teachers.
Some will argue that students are young and inexperienced, or that they could
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