The Importance Of The Electoral College In The United States

1237 Words5 Pages
The president of the United States is of utmost importance to the nation’s progress and success, both domestically and internationally. Hence, it follows that presidential elections are quite a popular event on a national level. Since the nation’s creation in 1776, it was clear that the president must be chosen wisely as well as fairly in order to preserve a democratic character in the United States and also to ensure an incapable president is note elected by the people. The solution that followed in response to these considerations was the establishment of the Electoral College, a method of indirect election of the president and his or her running mate for the vice presidency. The Electoral College establishes a group of electors who pledge to vote for the candidate of a specific political party. However, since this method of election is not completely reliant on the popular vote, it is possible for a candidate to become a minority president: a president who only received a majority of electoral votes (and not of the popular vote). Thus, the question arises whether the Electoral College is an appropriate method of selecting a president. After further analysis, it becomes clear that the Electoral College is not a proper mechanism for electing the president. Although the Electoral College prevents rapid change from radical third parties, the Electoral College should be abolished because it is not entirely democratic and causes the votes of certain individuals and states to be
Open Document