The Importance Of Traditional Architecture

1757 Words8 Pages
1. Introduction Following the never-ending search of national identity in the late 1950s, countries in Southeast Asia experienced a huge increase in urbanization which resulted in the aggressive introduction of contemporary arts, lifestyles and entertainment. Architecture was not left out. Under the movement of modernity, buildings were adapted to suit the climatic conditions as well as cultural interpretations of the region. This unique blend of architecture further hybridized via constant exchanges of ideas and concepts. Thus, newer and modern styles were infused with the traditions, be it physically or metaphorically to accord a new relevance in the modern-day context. Therefore, it leads to the notion that traditional architecture celebrates…show more content…
Countries in Southeast Asia witnessed the many changing scenes over the years:, new shopping districts, new residential types, new town plazas, demolished landmarks, but also vestiges of traditional vernacular architecture, some that are time-frozen, others precariously perched between modernity and traditions. Two case studies, the Former Asia Insurance Building and Balairung Hotel were chosen to discuss and compares the different levels of consideration and strategies implemented in each building to establish the essence of identity in its region via the notion of adaptation. 2. Essence of Identity Each architecture has a perceptible “essence,” the understanding of this essence is essential both to the discourse and the practice of architecture. The “essence” of architecture can be understood as an active process between human and the urban context. As such, the relation of ‘man’ to place is not simply that of being able to orientate himself, but it has to do with a much deeper process of identity. This was also echoed in Alan Colquhuan, Concept of Regionalism in which he mentioned that architecture lends itself to its unique “presence” or genius loci”. “Essentialist Model – All societies contain a core, or essence, that must be discovered and…show more content…
Symmetrically aligned windows and the insertion of vertical elements occupy the front façade. This would ensure that the maximum amount of light will penetrate into the internal spaces. As such, one could really say that the design of the Former Asia Insurance building is as though it is the ‘redesign’ of the traditional Art Deco shophouse into a high-rise building. Hence, the Former Asia Insurance Building demonstrates the rebirth of the tradition through adaptation to ensure that there are better and newer models of architecture in the era of
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