The Importance Of US Foreign Policies In The 1930s

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The Great Depression of the 1930s was a global event that derived in part from events in the United States and U.S. financial policies. As it lingered through the decade, it influenced U.S. foreign policies in such a way that the United States Government became even more isolationist. The economic situation created serious problems in America 's relations with Europe, and Japan launched a campaign of aggression in northeastern China. Hoover failed in his efforts to solve America 's economic troubles. He and most other Americans however would fail to understand the long-term importance of the forces gaining control in Germany and Japan. The initial factor was the First World War, which upset international balances of power and caused a dramatic shock to the global financial system.…show more content…
The gold standard, which had long served as the basis for national currencies and their exchange rates, had to be temporarily suspended in order to recover from the costs of the Great War, but the United States, European nations, and Japan put forth great effort to reestablish it by the end of the decade. The key factor in turning national economic difficulties into worldwide Depression seems to have been a lack of international coordination as most governments and financial institutions turned inwards. Great Britain, which had long underwritten the global financial system and had led the return to the gold standard, was unable to play its former role and became the first to drop off the standard in 1931. The United States, preoccupied with its own economic difficulties, did not step in to replace Great Britain as the creditor of last resort and dropped off the gold standard in 1933. The Great Depression caused the United States Government to pull back from major international involvement during the 1930s, but in the long run it contributed to the emergence of the United States as a world leader
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