The Importance Of Visual Culture

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Background Visual culture covers such a wide array of visual artifacts that it is often difficult to ascertain what exactly visual culture art education is and how it is used in the classroom. Unlike many art curriculums used today, visual culture has no core or basic principles that need to be taught before going on to something else (Duncum, 2015). I believe that this is an advantage because visual culture art education can be tailored to the culture and interests of the students. Students can learn to understand how the visual imagery relates to their lives by deconstruction as well as making their own images (Duncum, 2009) Although visual culture can be used to connect art to students’ lives in many different ways, it is still a necessity…show more content…
As previously stated children’s knowledge is not only gained through school but through the popular visual culture as well. Art educators have a responsibility to develop students’ understanding and knowledge of the world because visuals are so pervasive in today’s society (Eckhoff & Guberman, 2006). Without a curriculum to develop this students’ worldviews will be developed by the agenda set forth by the visual and media they consume. This can lead to students to accepting the cultural myths and stereotypes that are prevalent in visual media (Różalska, 2009). If viewers look passively then they will most likely passively accept the social positions and social functions that are represented in visual culture (Amburgy, 2011). By providing opportunities for students to critically examine the visuals that they see on a daily basis we can reduce the influence of the hidden agenda of visual culture (Han, 2013) and students can learn to analyze the overwhelming flow of visuals to construct understandings (Knochel, 2013). Even through the simple act of reflecting on the genres of TV shows they enjoy, students can understand why they are attracted to them. This will enhance a student’s ability to see beyond an image and change their thinking habits to resist media manipulation (Christopoulou, 2010). In addition, students can learn how visual culture helps us to reflect on our own history and the history of our communities (Bey,…show more content…
Although some students are resistant to thinking critically about the popular culture (Christopoulou, 2010; Duncum, 2017), students in Japan may be resistant but may also be apprehensive about sharing opinions that are different to those of their classmates. In my experience it is better to have more activities where students can share in small groups when exchanging opinions and would work better when critically examining visual artifacts. Also when having students reflect on visual culture it will be important not to impose the views of the teacher onto the students (Duncum, 2017). Rather than imposing western views or coming to conclusions of better or worse, it is better to just to highlight differences. A balance between having a pleasurable and socially relevant curriculum will be important to make sure that students are both engaged and challenged (Duncum, 2009,
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