The Innocent Conviction In Mark Twain's The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

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The Innocent Conviction “If you tell the truth you don’t have to remember anything.” Mark Twain. One dark night, Tom and Huck went to the graveyard for a cure for warts, which could be attained by swinging a cat over a freshly made grave. While they were waiting for devils to appear, Muff Potter, Injun Joe, and Dr. Robinson showed up to dig the freshly buried corpse. But when disagreements came, Injun Joe killed Dr. Robinson and convinced the drunken Muff Potter that he did it, after he came to. Tom and Huck then swore a blood oath to never tell anyone. Everyone agrees that Tom and Huck saw Injun Joe kill Mr. Robinson, but some people believe that Tom and Huck should have told the police that Injun Joe killed Mr. Robinson, and some people believe Tom and Huck should not have told the…show more content…
Robinson for three reasons. If they would have told the police, Muff Potter would not have been in jail for a crime he did not commit, Injun Joe should not have been able to run the streets a murderer, and it was the right thing to do. The first reason Tom and Huck should have told the police that Injun Joe killed Mr. Robinson was that if they would have told the police, Muff Potter would not have been in jail for a crime he did not commit. Injun Joe killed Mr. Robinson so he should be in jail instead of blaming Muff and making him suffer the consequences of what he did. In jail, there is no freedom and not having freedom is not something an innocent person should suffer. The second reason Tom and Huck should have told the police that Injun Joe killed Mr. Robinson was that Injun Joe should not have been able to run the streets a mad, malevolent murderer. If Joe was capable of killing Mr. Robinson surely he could kill someone else without a second thought. Murderers shouldn’t be able to run free because they feel as if they got away with it, that it’s ok, or that they could do it again and get away with

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