The Jewelry By Guy De Maupassant Analysis

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"The simplest of women are wonderful liars who can extricate themselves from the most difficult dilemmas with a skill bordering on genius." This is a quote attributed to Guy de Maupassant, the author of The Jewelry, in which he emphasizes the crafty methods that women often use to elude problematic obstacles in relationships. The Jewelry begins by introducing M. Lantin, a chief clerk in the office of the Minister of the Interior, as a love-stricken man with a strong attraction for the beautiful daughter of a country-tutor. As their relationship blossoms, Lantin and his love settle down and marry. He provides the income while she efficiently manages how it is spent. Their marriage is portrayed as the marriage of an ideal couple. Although as time progresses, Lantin finds fault with some of his wife's obsessions: "her love of the theater, and her passion for false jewelry"(de Maupassant 656). After much time and many visits to the theater Lantin's wife suddenly…show more content…
Lantin was presented in the story as a chief clerk in the office of the Minister of the Interior(de Maupassant 656). A chief clerk is an adequate occupation with enough income to sustain Lantin and his wife. However, his wife, who directs how the money is spent, manages to not only sustain their household but also has enough for "false" jewelry and trips to the theater. Shortly after M. Lantin's wife had passed, the narrator says, "He got a little into debt, like men obliged to live by their wits. At last one morning that he happened to find himself without a cent in his pocket, and a whole week to wait before he could draw his monthly salary..."(de Maupassant 657). I find it difficult to believe that Lantin, having a shortage of money directly after his wife's death, is a mere coincidence. Especially since he is no longer required to support his wife. Because he didn't have to accommodate his wife's costly desires, a reasonable mind might conclude that Lantin would have more funds than
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