Jim Crow Laws In The 1960's

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Beginning in the 1890s southern states passed a wide variety of Jim Crow laws that mandated racial segregation and separation in public facilities. Under the Jim Crow laws, blacks in southern states suffered from a system of discrimination which invaded every part of their lives. They were denied voting rights, they constantly encountered discrimination in housing and employment. When using public facilities like pools, they would have to use the colored only pools while the whites used the whites only pool. The blacks had colored bars and restaurants and the whites had their own. Separate but equal. Before a raft of Jim Crow laws were passed at the end of the nineteenth century, a combination of habit, customs, and a handful of laws effectively…show more content…
The widespread belief of scientific racism and the results of the Spanish American War, contributed to the development of a more pervasive system of racial segregation. Efforts taken by black petitioners in the late nineteenth century sometimes hastened Jim Crow’s rise. When confronted by demands for more expansive civil rights, whites often responded by calling for more comprehensive laws to further separate the races. Populist leaders attempted to challenge Democratic control by pooling together the frustrations of poor whites and black farmers, however, the democrats appealed to the racial anxieties of whites by instilling the fear of the negro rule. Thereafter the democratic state legislature passed a variety of measures designed to limit citizens’ rights to vote, including cumulative poll taxes, the white primary in which only white voters could participate, and the literacy tests. In practice, both blacks and poor whites were stripped of their right to…show more content…
Rumors spread, fueled by race prejudice, of Japanese-American citizens. This led to further discrimination of anyone of Japanese descent no matter of job or state of living. Restrictions were imposed, such as curfews, individuals who broke curfew were subject to arrest. Soon evacuation orders were posted in Japanese-American communities. Japanese-Americans were given about a week to settle affairs and gather their belongings, families were forced to sell their homes, stores and other assets. In some cases, family members were separated. In early February 1942, the war department created 10 restricted zones along the pacific coast. After being evacuated from their homes, Japanese-Americans were first taken to temporary assembly centers. From there they were transported inland to the internment camps. This was seen as the greatest violation of American citizens rights. By 1946, Japanese Americans were liberated from the camps, but they still had memories of the injustices during the war. Japanese Americans strived to create public knowledge of the injustices they had endured. Many of them lost their land when they were brought to the camps, so when they returned they tried to regain what they had lost following events fueled by racial prejudice and wartime
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