The Juvenile System

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Sweeping changes need to be made the juvenile system. They’re too many incarcerations, Locking up the children of our future based off a minor mistakes and age no longer being taken into considerations to determine the correct punishment. Since 2006, there has been a huge problem with the Juvenile System locking up minors. ‘The original theory behind separating juvenile offenders from adult offenders was to provide care and direction for youngsters instead of isolation and punishment.” Over 70 million children under the age of 18 have been in trouble with the Juvenile System, that is more than 25 percent of the United States population. In 2002 the Federal Bureau of Investigation reported that about 1.5 million youth under age 18 are arrested…show more content…
So far the only programs that are in use to fix this situation is ones helping them pick better peers, getting them into sports and even helping them find jobs. “The severe behavioral problems of juvenile offenders are a result of complex and interactive individual and environmental factors, which elicit and maintain offending behavior. Therefore, the focus of effective treatment must be on addressing such criminogenic needs and the multiple "systems in which the young person comes from.” Recent research demonstrates that in order to achieve the best outcomes for youth offenders and the general public, community-based, empirically supported intervention practices must be adopted as an alternative to incarceration wherever possible.” By keeping them in something positive and productive they have less time to be in trouble. These programs need to be more well known because it will decrease the number of juveniles…show more content…
Sweeping changes need to be made the juvenile system. They’re too many incarcerations, Locking up the children of our future based off a minor mistakes. In the future if these problems are not fixed we will continue to have a high number of youth incarcerations, and an even higher number of future adults going to prison. This cycle needs to be broken, or a significant change needs to be made. “More surprisingly, given that prison is supposed to deter crime, going to jail also made kids more likely to offend again. Young offenders who were incarcerated were a staggering 67 percent more likely to be in jail (again) by the age of 25 than similar young offenders who didn’t go to

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