The Kitara Empire

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the hierarchy is made of by Ritual officers who were three i.e. the ngabe (absent in in Ngaya and Kahama Chiefdoms); kitunga, exists at the time the chief is installed; and the bagohogoh, who are o are of slave stock according to Abrahams (1967). Finally, the group of Bisilibe and Bazengi (Nobles and commoners) was held at the bottom. The Bisilibe comprised the members of the ruling family. The bazengi, are commoners in English denoting outside builders. The role of long distance trade became vital in the formation and consolidation of the Nyamwezi hegemony over other communities. Iliffe (1995, 2007: 187) in his book assessed that the ‘Nyamwezi traders from western Tanzania reached Lake Nyasa, probably supplying a trade route to the coast…show more content…
north-western Tanzania (Karagwe and Kyamutwara), Rwanda and Burundi, and eastern parts of the Democratic Republic of Congo-DRC. Sometimes, the Kitara Empire historically is known as the Bachwezi/Chwezi Kingdom. In accordance with the work of colonial agricultural officer in Bunyoro (1954–1955), Dunbar (1965: V) in his preface, wrote that the Bunyoro is the ‘remnant of the ancient and extensive kingdom of Kitara which covered the greater part of western Uganda, in east central Africa, between latitudes 2° 20' North and 1 ° 0' South and longitudes 30° 0' and 33° 0' East. This kingdom stretched southwards to the River Kagera, southeastwards over Singo, Bulemezi, Buruli and Bunyara (Bugerere), eastwards and northwards to the River Nile and westwards beyond Lake Albert and the River…show more content…
It was formed by the Abatembuzi Dynasty. Then, the Abachwezi dynasty under the kingship of Ndahura, Mulindwa, and Wamara succeeded the Abatembuzi in leadership. The third dynasty which formed the Bunyoro Kitara Kingdom was the Babiito. Factors for the Decline in the 16th century: The invasion from the north made by the Luo migrated from the modern South Sudan. The Biito or Babiito, a Luo clan led by their Chief, Labongo and settled in northern Uganda where the Kitara was headed at Bunyoro Province. The new kingdom of Bunyoro Kitara was established by Labongo until collapsed in the 19th century. The Bunyoro Kitara Kingdom: The empire of Bunyoro Kitara replaced the Kitara significantly around the 16th and 17th centuries. It is believed that Isingoma Mpuga Rukidi I was the founder of the babiito kings making 27 Mukama/Omukama. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, ‘one great kingdom, Bunyoro, predominated through most of the region; its central territory stretched from Lake Albert southward to the Katonga river and was ringed by a whole series of much smaller tributary kingdoms and chiefdoms’ (Gray, ed., 1975:
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