The Lost Colony Of Roanoke Island Essay

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Roanoke Island Fritz, Jean. The Lost Colony of Roanoke. New York: G. P Putnam Sons, 2004. Laura Ingalls Wilder Award recipient and author of many historical biographies, Jean Fritz explores the circumstances that culminated in the mysterious disappearance of the Roanoke Island settlers. Her book, The Lost Colony of Roanoke Island covers the time period from 1584; when Roanoke Island and the surrounding area discovery; until the discovery of the abandoned colony in 1590. Sir Walter Raleigh 's interest in conquering the New World and compounding on the potential wealth there shines a light on Sir Walter Raleigh 's and the Virgin Queen 's not so secretive intimate relationship. The first voyages to scout the area and gain perspective on the land…show more content…
". National Geographic, December 8, 2013. https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/12/131208-roanoke-lost-colony-discovery-history-raleigh/. News apprentice at National Geographic Magazine and currently senior editor of Science at The Daily Beast, Tanya Basu explains the new developing technological advancements in science and the role it plays in further investigating the disappearance of the colonists of Roanoke Island. Theorizing that John White 's hand-drawn map " La Virginia Pars…show more content…
Academic OneFile (accessed February 11, 2018). http://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu/ps/i.do?p=AONE&u=vic_liberty&id=GALE%7CA150206569&v=2.1&it=r&sid=AONE&asid=c70137a1. New York Times writer William K. Steven investigates how the key to the famed colonist of Roanoke Island 's disappearance may live in Cyprus trees. Cyprus trees in both the southeastern part of Virginia and the northeastern part of North Carolina locations are near the abandoned English settlement of Roanoke give researchers insight into the climate conditions during that time period. Cyprus ' tree rings give evidence that during that settlement attempt there was a severe drought in motion and would have made settling there close to impossible. Growing and maintaining an adequate food supply would be difficult and fruitless. These new findings have revamped the support for dwindling food supply as the cause of the settler 's disappearance and have captured the attentions of historians, who previously did not consider climate conditions a variable in the disappearances. William Steven 's article provides another variable to consider when researching Roanoke Island and gives the reader tangible evidence to support the low food supply theories. Michael Farquhar Washington Post, Staff
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