The Mexican Revolution

770 Words4 Pages
he migration from Mexico to the U.S. constantly shifted with the reasoning of having fluctuating demands and needs for workers. However, an increase in migration became a trend for Mexicans from 1900 to 1920. As the Mexican Revolution was gaining steam, many seeked refuge from the political conflict that took place within Mexico’s government and citizens. The U.S.’s involvement with supporting Mexico’s government against the rebels gave rebels reason to attack the United States. Pancho Villa, for instance, gave the U.S. press a method of antagonizind Mexicans by describing Mexican rebels as those who were for anarchy and against the Mexican federal government that the U.S. was supporting. The revolution, despite taking place in Mexico, caused…show more content…
World War I allowed for many for many Mexicans, documented and undocumented, to obtain jobs in the U.S. as the county needed workers to ease the ongoing labor shortage. The assimilation of Mexicans was made more apparent as Mexicans desired to obtain constitutional rights, causing for many to feel like Americans. Mexican American veterans of the war became active in politics to fight for the rights of Mexican Americans. After the war, new organizations such as the Hijos de México and La Orden de Hijos de América focused on helping members obtain their U.S. citizenship. The organizations would eventually merge to form LULAC, the League of United Latin American Citizens, and focus on reaching social, economic, and racial…show more content…
The most imporant contribution of Mexican Americans was the creation of groups and movements, such as LULAC, the League of United Latin American Citizens, and the MAM, Mexican American Movement , that caused for Mexican Americans to have the desire to establish equality with other races. Despite LULAC’s origins involving the exclusion of Mexicans who were not U.S. citizens, the organization evolved. Female activists became more visible, and the organization assisted with the enforcement of achieveing a proper education for Mexican Americans. Similarly, the MAM encouraged the need for education, business, and social work to allow Mexican Americans to establish themselves in the United States with better work and life opportunities. Many other groups with similar intentions were able to meet and discuss how to obtain equality when the Congress of Spanish-Speakiing People took place in a national conference. Even though the Congress faced backlash, activists explained the situations that Mexican Americans found themselves in. Luisa Moreno was one such activist, for she declared the Congress to be against antialien legislation and justifyed how Mexicans came to America for work and how Mexican Americans struggled to pay higher taxes than
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