Symbolism In Casablanca

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The movie Casablanca has similarities to World War II. The movie begins by the viewer meeting Rick Blaine. He is the owner of a club that helps people from other countries receive their letters of transit. This club was a safe haven for many of the refugees. This club would allow for the refuges to obtain their letters of transit as well as earning some quick cash for traveling from gambling in the secret room. Another huge problem that Casablanca places emphasis on is that the German and French never see eye-to-eye. German Nazi’s were not happy about the letters of transit and would do anything to make sure that it stopped happening, for example shutting down Rick’s club. Rick Blaine: In my eyes Rick symbolizes control. When the movie…show more content…
She is married to Victor Laszlo. She is the reason that Rick changed from a man who doesn’t stick his neck out for nobody to a man who will help people out. She also used to live in Paris and have a relationship with Rick, this all happened while she believed that her husband Victor was killed while in a concentration camp. Captain Renault: Captain Renault symbolizes power. He is a French official. Captain Renault is very powerful but only uses his power when he is instructed to do so. He allowed Rick’s club to stay open even though he was aware of the gambling…maybe this had something to do with the fact that he was gambling and winning money. By the end of the movie Rick kills Major Strasser and instead of calling the police Captain Renault tells the police to round up the usual suspects. Nobody questioned him and that shows how he is in control of situations and how much respect people have for his…show more content…
Sam is loyal to Rick, and Rick is loyal to Sam. He is the type of man to be there when the going gets tough. He shows that to Rick by moving from Paris to Casablanca. He also shows how he is loyal to Rick by not playing a specific song that Rick and Ilsa used to have him play for them. The song represented a difficult time in Rick’s life and Sam understood that. During World War II African-American and Caucasian’s weren’t known to be very close with one another, but Sam and Rick prove that this isn’t the case. In America, African-American’s like Sam were being treated as slaves not as individuals like Rick was treating him. Rick saw Sam as his equal not someone inferior to him, and that is seen throughout the
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