Burnout In Nursing

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Burnout is quite common among caregivers. According to Lyndon (2016), the emotional intensity and work environment associated with caregiving put clinicians at an elevated risk of burnout. However, there has been an alarming prevalence of burnout in health care workers which raises concerns about patient safety and the overall quality of care. Dyrbye et al. (2017) attribute increase in burnout to changes in the healthcare delivery system. In their discussion paper, the authors assert that shifting patient demographics have resulted in changes in healthcare which have put increased burdens on healthcare professionals resulting in a highly burned out clinician population. Available research suggests that more than half of US’s physician population…show more content…
In a research study investigating the effect of burnout and other characteristics on patient safety, Welp, Meier, and Manser (2015) revealed that demotivation, lack of energy and reduced cognitive function in healthcare workers correlate with caregivers’ perspectives on safety and mortality ratios. Burnout is quite likely to affect clinician attentiveness which increases the risk of patient or clinician errors. Black (2014) posits that for nurses to effectively provide quality care to their patients, they need to meet their own self-care requisites. In view of the negative effects of burnout in advanced clinical practice, it is imperative to address this issue. Current studies attest to the effectiveness of self-care in minimizing the symptoms of burnout in healthcare professionals (Hylton, 2015; Weekes, 2014; Smith, 2015). Orem’s Self-Care Deficit Theory can help address the self-care requirements of nurses in advanced clinical…show more content…
The greater proportion of available research applies the Self-Care Theory to patients and not to caregivers. Nevertheless, clinicians with burnout exhibit emotional exhaustion which signifies a self-care deficit. As such, patient interventions to manage workplace-related stress may also apply to nurse practitioners with burnout syndrome. The Self-Care Deficit Theory can be used to evaluate coping or prevention mechanisms for clinicians with burnout syndrome. According to Hylton (2015), unaddressed workplace stress may result in burnout. Intrinsically, dealing with work-related stress helps clinicians reduce or avoid burnout. Workplace stress can be managed through improved communication (verbal, non-verbal and
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