The Organ Trade Analysis

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The Organ trade, more specifically commercial trade of human organs, is the practice of treating a human organ as a commodity, for the purpose of being sold or bought for commercial gain (The Kidney Foundation of Canada, n.d.). This practice puts a price on human life, and enables those of wealthier standpoint to mistreat and enable those of a poorer standpoint to put a price on their lives and sell their organs. The coercer of buyer to seller in an organ transaction is the organ broker, one who finds the seller and drives the transaction for the buyer (Mcgraw-Hill, 2002). These people often times trick and manipulate persons in low economic situations to sell their internal organs in order to receive money in return. They take advantage of…show more content…
He is known as the first organ broker in the United States to be convicted as such (Porter and Johnson, 2009). Rosenbaum would take blood samples from a possible buyer, then have them analyzed and start the search for a matching donor in Israel’s slums (Porter and Johnson, 2009). He often used fear in his tactics to seal the deal with his clients and even boasted of his work, “So far, I’ve never had a failure…I’m doing this a long time” (Porter and Johnson, 2009). He would buy the donor’s kidney for ten thousand dollars and turn around and sell to his buyer for one hundred sixty thousand dollars, making him a well established, wealthy “businessman” (Porter and Johnson, 2009). Rosenbaum was charged as a criminal and now faces a long list of charges that may ruin the rest of his life. In the sights of the court, the system worked, and Rosenbaum was charged as the criminal he is and will pay for it. Yet, many people still decry the imprisonment of people such as Rosenbaum, saying he is not a criminal, and that many others like him merely help others for a price. What is a…show more content…
Is buying and selling human organs as normal commodities ethical treatment of human body parts? The selling of organs commercially would encourage thieves and even medical professionals to euthanize vegetative and even comatose patients in order to harvest organs and profit. This would end the lives of many people who may have had a chance to wake up and continue life as they knew it, but because of the need for organs, or more specifically, the need for money, they do not stand a chance. Even if someone sells one of their kidneys, an organ they can live without, they have to risk the illegal removal of their kidney, often in not the most “up to code” areas of the world. People who sell their kidneys also have to live with some dietary restrictions, and also need to be screened by a medical professional at least once a year (National Kidney Foundation, 2015). How would a seller of a kidney in a third world country be able to afford a special diet? How would a seller of a kidney in a third world country be able to see medical help to check if their one kidney is still in shape? A 2008 debate summit in Istanbul came to a conclusion that, “Organ trafficking and transplant tourism violate the principles of equity, justice, and respect for human dignity and should be prohibited. Transplant commercialism targets impoverished and otherwise vulnerable donors leading to inequity and injustice”
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