Freedom From Want Norman Rockwell Analysis

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When thinking about the harmonious and blessing Thanksgiving, one connects the setting and atmosphere to the painting of Freedom From Want by Norman Rockwell. Norman Rockwell, an American painter and illustrator, was best known for his depiction of everyday American life. In Rockwell’s early years, he putted the emphases of his paintings on the warm and idealistic aspect of world, treating with simplistic charm and certain degree of humor. In January 1943, during World War II, when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt gave an emotionally moving speech, addressing his vision to the American freedom and the desperate need of concern for the real threat of war, Rockwell was greatly inspired. Thence, he painted the Four Freedoms including Freedom…show more content…
Among the four paintings, Freedom from Want is the third in a series of Four Freedom and it appeared on the cover of The Saturday Evening post and was universally recognized. This artwork is an oil painting on canvas with the measurement of forty-five point seven-five inches times thirty-five point five inches. Its current location is in Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, where Rockwell spent his later life. The effect of Freedom from Want is so unimaginable that it even stimulated and helped to raise one hundred and thirty million dollars toward the war effort. Hence, it was being considered as one of the most iconic and significant painting of all time with its exquisite details and the covert connotation behind the painting itself. The Freedom from Want is Rockwell’s implication to celebrate American freedom, delivering the emotional___ and clear message with the representation of harmonies Thanksgiving Day meal…show more content…
The stylistic characteristic of this painting is realistic and exquisite in details. Undeniably, the composition of the painting is unique in a way that Rockwell painted the table at the central space, occupying more than half of the image. Around the table, a mutigenerational family sit closely with one another, seemingly have close kinship. The two prominent figures in the painting are the mother and father, standing at the head of the dinner table. The mother has a discreet expression, presenting a huge and succulent turkey in its place. She wears a white apron, with blue blouse decorated by florid patterns and shapes. Behind the mother stands the father, who is ready to carve the turkey with the knife. The father wears in decent suit and blue tie, his face is rather chubby comparing with the mother beside him. Both of them cast their sights downward, gazing lovingly and focusing on the turkey that they are ready to serve. To examine closely, the father puts his fingertip lightly on the edge of the table. On the two sides of the table, nine people of different ages sit together side by side and all of them lean forward, demonstrating their exciting and expecting mood. Although the family members have gap in their ages, they share common joy and pleasant expression. There are five people sit at the left side of the table, the little
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