Figurative Language In John Donne's Poetry

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John Donne For one thing John Donne was an extraordinary poet in which he wrote about romance and religious ideologies. Although he wrote in a variety of genres, John Donne was more so a romantic writer who expressed romantic thoughts in his poetry. Each poem has a distinct message to the reader, but all come together as one theme. The topic of discussion concerns these three poems: The Flea, The Good-Morrow, and The Sun Rising. In the light of The Flea, it opens up about how it is about a boy and girl, “Mark but this flea, and mark in this,” (Donne line 1). They are having conflicting interests in how the flea is suppose to bind them as one. As she denies this thing, “How little that which thou deniest me is;” (Donne line 2). The lovers…show more content…
The flea is a symbol representing sex in how often many times in young relationships the pressure of sex can put a strain on the relationship if one is not willing to do it. Not to mention this is what is happening between the boy and girl throughout the poem. Also using figurative language in poetry can help lighten up the mood or to have a better understanding of what is going on. So if it were not were these poetic elements in poetry it would be hard for readers to interpret what is going on throughout The…show more content…
He conveys the idea with The Flea as how the girl does not want to have sex with the boy as he believes it will create a stronger bond. Also in The Good-Morrow, the couple has a powerful emotional connection which has matured in the growth of their relationship creating true love. Then The Sun Rising, focuses on the lovers in a way of how they want to stay together forever in each others arms. Lastly John Donne, was trying to convey the different levels and stepping stones of a relationship in how it grows and contracts. Whether or not these poems were written in the 1600s they are still relatable to matters of love in our day and
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