The Power Of Power In The Handmaid's Tale By George Orwell

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Introduction:
“Our language is the reflection of ourselves. A language is an exact reflection of the character and growth of its speakers.” Those who access to the great potential of literature and language attain widespread liberation and selfhood. This reward allows people to formulate and trigger defiance from the conscious subjugation they have fallen subject to. Language also however, can be used as a tool of power itself whether it be by oppressive reigning powers or a moral code. Both these concepts reveal the true, exceptional and uncontainable power of language, the underlying notion in many highly accredited works of literature. Novels such as Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, The Handmaid 's Tale by Margaret Atwood, The 1984 by George
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In The 1984, Writing out of view from the many cameras he criticizes the party and big brother, providing him with the satisfaction of the Ministry be unaware of him recording what he couldn’t freely express in public. This reflects the effect of literature on him as he attains the liberation he so desperately needs to maintain his sanity due to his knowledge of Party tactics from working at the Ministry of Truth. Unknowingly at the time, this made him a resistance of change to the constant re-editing and perfecting done by The Ministry of Truth as he had proof that showed things were once different. He had proof that the party was not an all perfect power, challenging the parties suppression of dissident literature as his words and negative opinion provide an alternative view. This prevents the parties ultimate goal of an unanimity of thought, unanimity of thought which consequently would result in no one being able to conceptualize anything that would even question the parties ever-ruling power. When “The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism” written by symbolic enemy of the state Emmanuel Goldstein, falls into Winston 's hands___ Have got into situation through words (captured) irony of word
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