The Power Of The Monster In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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The story, Frankenstein is a romantic novel. A romantic novel stresses emotion and the power of nature. The novel can also be described as a tragedy. In the story, Victor Frankenstein creates a monster, but he abandons the monster. Society constantly rejects the monster violently, leading to him hating Victor. The Creature causes the death of Victor’s closest friends and family members. While this may portray the monster as the villain, the monster is alone and miserable. If Victor had stayed with the monster, there may have been a different outcome. So who is really the villain, Victor or the monster? Victor Frankenstein creates the monster but neglects the consequences, leaving him as the villain of Frankenstein.
Throughout the story Victor makes many mistakes, but his first is creating the monster to attain glory. Victor does not have any reason to meddle with nature, but the desire for
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After creating the monster, Victor looks at him with disgust. Victor realizes that he has created a monster. Unable to look at the Creature, he retires to his bed. Victor has a nightmare and awakens to the creature standing over him. In his fright, he flees from his room and leaves the creature alone (Shelley 35-36). Alone, the Creature leaves Victor’s home. The Creature stumbles across cottagers. He watches them from afar. Even though he never meets them, he views them as friends. Finally, the Creature approaches the blind elder in the family. While they are speaking, the family returns and one attack the Creature (Shelley 96-97). This event is one of many events that pushes the Creature to despise humanity. Victor leaving the Creature is the worst thing that could have happened. The Creature can be compared to an infant in his understanding. He did not know why people hated him. Every time the creature comes across a human, he is received with violence. This shapes the Creature into the monster that kills Victor’s
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