The Progressive Era Social Justice Analysis

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The Progressive Era, from 1890- 1920 was an influential time in American history. There was political reform in an effort to bring about social justice, but it was also a time when big businesses thrived. However, in the past their prominence and power went unchecked, now liberal radicals started fighting for justice, making the government control the corporations before they destroyed the country. With big businesses growing at a quick pace, they needed more management, known as middle management, to control it. Alfred Chandler, a business professor, specifically a economist, analyzes this in chapter eight, “Mass Production” from his book, The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business. In this chapter, he focuses on how…show more content…
In his book, Struggle for Justice: Social Responsibility and the Liberal State, specifically in chapter three, “The Social Question” Dawley claims that the laissez-faire policies were no longer working, the government must regulate corporations for the protection of the workers. His thesis states, “All the same, there was no escaping the growing imbalance between the inherited governing system and the way the society actually worked, a condition that posed the ‘social question’ and dictated that voices would be raised against the laissez-faire policies of the existing liberal state.” Throughout the chapter, he analyzed the progressive and socialist movement toward social reform. He also compared and contrasted the two. Furthermore, he evaluated hegemony, imperialism, nationalism, and the American South, all aimed at how they dealt with social justice in America and how the government should…show more content…
White wrote an article, “Information, Markets, and Corruption: Transcontinental Railroads in the Gilded Age” published in The Journal of American History, he rejects the idea that the building of the transcontinental railroad was a grand venture, but a corruption filled schemed aimed at making the rich richer. His thesis states, “At the center of national corruption, both financial and political, were particular corporations: the railroad. They were the major corporate consumers of capital and the leading corporate objects of both regulation and aid…the transcontinental chartered to cross the western United States-were particularly open to corruption.” White specifically writes about the financial corruption. In his article, he also explains what other historians have written on the
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