The Pros And Cons Of Japanese-American Internment Camps

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“We were American citizen. We were incarcerated by our American government in American internment camps here in the United States. The term ‘Japanese internment camp’ is both grammatically and factually incorrect.” (George Takei) Helen Horano Christ was walking along the fence at her Internment camp. She was recollecting of the times when she had the freedom to go wherever she pleased. She panned around the camp to see guards everywhere carrying large guns reminding her she can’t leave even if she tried. Helen looked down to see a snake slithering by her foot. Quickly she moved her foot away. This spooked the snake and slithered under the fence and away from the camp. It was then that Helen was reminded that even though she was an American …show more content…

The concern is can something so horrible as the Japanese-American Internment camps happen again? The answer is a simple yes. So how is the United States to stop this from happening again? The best way is education. Refusing to forget the time the United States imprisoned it’s own citizens. Continuing to remember means it can’t be repeated without the repercussions surfacing in the mind. Education on diversity and encouraging the celebration of diversity is highly needed. The more diversity is taught and presented as positive thing the more people will see it that way. And finally the education on the negative effects on society that prejudice has. Racism should never be encouraged, but it should taught on what minorities have had to o though because of prejudice. Sadly the United States education system barely touches on the subject of Japanese American Internment camps, if it’s even spoken about. Instead they just turn their head and pretend it never even happened and thus inching closer and closer to the possibility of history repeating …show more content…

They had to live in harsh conditions and give up their freedom. All in the name of “national security.” Japanese Americans struggled dealing with the knowledge that their freedom had been stripped away. Though many were American-born Citizens they were treated as tough they were foreigners, treated as prisoners in their own country. For years these American citizens had trusted their country. They had been proud to call themselves Americans, but the country they were loyal to turned on them. Japanese internment camps caused Japanese American Families to lose things they held dearest to them. All because of fear and racism going hand in

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