The Pros And Cons Of The Korean War Memorial

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More than 58,000 American soldiers are represented at the Vietnam War Memorial. On the National Parks Service’s page about the memorial, a veteran can be seen looking for a name. The memorial is honoring the service men and women with no question of morality or ethics. Close by is the Korean War Memorial. 19 statues, representing various branches of the armed forces, appear to be wandering towards an objective.
Many more remembrances occupy the streets of DC. In every state, there lies some sort of memorial to a soldier or the military as a whole. Locally, in North Carolina, there is various memorial sites. Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville is one example. Each one of these locations are usually erected by the government. The information, put together by government officials. USS North Carolina, a decommissioned World War II era battleship, is an example of a privatized site that is considered a war memorial. The information is still gathered by what the government allowed to be declassified. According to Washington.org, the memorials are meant to remind us that freedom isn’t free. Some may have a more individualized message. Phillip Kennicott of the Washington Post said “Memorials set history in stone… And ‘set in stone’ suggests that an idea, or a fact, has been placed in its ultimate form, beyond emendation and, often, beyond debate or contradiction.” He pushes this claim further by explaining that memorials is the government telling us how to remember a particular conflict.

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